Modern Technology (and Trust) for Communicators

Effective, modern communications requires both trust and modern technology led by professional communicators.

 

Corporate communications, according to the latest crowd-sourced definition on Wikipedia, ”is a set of activities involved in managing and orchestrating all internal and external communications aimed at creating favorable point of view among stakeholders on which the company depends.” 

Wrong. If this is your definition of corporate communications, you are failing as a communicator.

The notion that communications is “orchestrated” and aimed at “creating a favorable point of view” is antiquated and undermines the concept of synchronous communications. That is to say, two-way communications (dialogue) between one or more individuals. Face-to-face dialogue is one example; instant messaging is another. Though not instantaneous, discussion forums and “user commenting” also provide tools that allow the communicator and the audience to exchange communications (comments, questions, dialogue).

The definition for internal communications (employee communications) is far more precise, “the function responsible for effective communications among participants within an organization. The scope of the function varies by organization and practitioner, from producing and delivering messages and campaigns on behalf of management, to facilitating two-way dialogue...”

 

TWO-WAY DIALOGUE

 

The key to the modern communications equation is “two-way dialogue.” 

CONTINUE READING MODERN TECHNOLOGY (AND TRUST) FOR COMMUNICATORS

Corporate communications, according to the latest crowd-sourced definition on Wikipedia, ”is a set of activities involved in managing and orchestrating all internal and external communications aimed at creating favorable point of view among stakeholders on which the company depends.” 

Wrong. If this is your definition of corporate communications, you are failing as a communicator.

The notion that communications is “orchestrated” and aimed at “creating a favorable point of view” is antiquated and undermines the concept of synchronous communications. That is to say, two-way communications (dialogue) between one or more individuals. Face-to-face dialogue is one example; instant messaging is another. Though not instantaneous, discussion forums and “user commenting” also provide tools that allow the communicator and the audience to exchange communications (comments, questions, dialogue).

The definition for internal communications (employee communications) is far more precise, “the function responsible for effective communications among participants within an organization. The scope of the function varies by organization and practitioner, from producing and delivering messages and campaigns on behalf of management, to facilitating two-way dialogue...”

 

TWO-WAY DIALOGUE

 

The key to the modern communications equation is “two-way dialogue.” 

CONTINUE READING MODERN TECHNOLOGY (AND TRUST) FOR COMMUNICATORS